Risk Taker


In response to: Reshma Saujani - Teach Girls Bravery Not Prefection 

I have really gotten into TED Talks in 2016. They have opened my eyes to a plethora of topics presented by experts in their fields. The latest talk that pointed out an interesting problem was presented by Reshma Saujani. She presented on how boys are taught to take risks and girls are taught to be prefect. She went on to say that girls have stop doing, trying and even stray away from challenges because they feel like they couldn't excel or was not ready. 

I was not one of those girls. I was applauded as being brave throughout my childhood. I was able to speak to adults without being shy, I could give a speech in front of a crowd and even attended an event without knowing anyone there. I traveled to other countries including Japan without my parents at 14 years old for a few months. I even travel around Asia in my early twenties alone and with friends. I have always felt that I was brave. 

However, that might be where my bravery had ended, changed. I use to be able to jump at any idea. I knew that I could try my best and be satisfied with the outcome. It was only me that was effected. The best ideas often come from something missing from someone's life. But I have not done much about it other than to write and draw my thoughts. I guess my bravery to try something new and crazy, ended in my twenties. I returned home and felt that doing anything unusual was for young people or those that were "unsettled". Perhaps it was graduate school that ruined me. I was all set to explore what life had to offer but the promise of great income, stability and advancement won.  Perhaps I failed to look at the details beforehand, but with age, they are visible to me now.


Adulthood, the most desire part of life that teenagers and young adults crave for has actually been the greatest struggle so far. It is a shame because I thought this was when the money and fun was nonstop. Well, I thought that at 14 years old when I couldn't get what I wanted. But now that I am responsible for myself and a husband, I have taken on a more serious approach to adulthood. I've grown more interested in doing the "best thing as an adult" rather than the best thing for me. I have muffled my dreams and desires to fluff the bed of "responsibility" as if the only way to be an adult was to be bored. 

Well I refuse to spend the rest of my life surrounded by energy sucking tasks just to claim that I have "adulted" correctly. Right along side my generation X'ers or Y'ers or Millennials or whatever I am, I will live a fulfilling life. I have to be able to "fight, scratch and claw, baby" for the life I want! (Dave Ramsey) 

I have been sitting on a great idea for a couple years. I have always felt like I am not the best "employee". I never feel satisfied, and encouraged and I am often easily bored. This might sound like a child, but some office work can seem childish. I'm so creative. I spend lots of time thinking, imagining and improving. I sort and organize and even run numbers for fun. I get more joy out of helping people improve their budgets than improving the budget of the district I was working in. I didn't enjoy finding ways for the company to save money so that their customers can spend money. I enjoy saving money so that I can travel to a new country.

So I am taking my passion, my newly found life as an infertile couple, and reignite my bravery. I will take risks like I should. I plan to not let the typical adult life stand in my way anymore. I like to travel, laugh, cook international dishes and crunch numbers. I am taking a big risk as a full time Entrepreneur! 

So thank you Reshma Saujani for pointing out that a risk is better than being perfect. That beauty can arise from the ashes from a crazy, shorthanded idea. Thank you for pointing out that passion matters when identifying yourself. For all those that are struggling with trying something new, I say yes to imperfect risk taking for growth and personal internal happiness! 

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